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Satellite Salon // Light

July 2, 2012


an evening of art-science conversations

with presentations by:
Dr. Noam Libeskind, Antonia Low, Richard Mosse

Berlin Mitte
Tuesday 26th June 2012

Supported by ECA/ University of Edinburgh

Our presenters:

Dr. Noam Libeskind is Minerva post-doctoral research fellow at the Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik, Potsdam. Working in the cosmology group, his research is focused primarily on satellite galaxies. In 2011 Noam collaborated with his father, architect Daniel Libeskind, on the light installation “eL” presented at Art Basel Miami Beach.

Antonia Low is an artist living and working in Berlin. Widely exhibited, Antonia’s interventions, installations and structures often use electric light and its materials of production to reveal usually hidden frameworks of systems and draw attention to gaps in apparently void settings.

Richard Mosse is an Irish photographer based in New York and currently on a residency at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. Richard’s work has been widely exhibited internationally and he is a recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship 2011. Infra, the recent exhibition of his photographs of the Congo, utilises a type of colour infrared film originally developed for camouflage detection.

Our guests include:

Rohini Devashar is the current Artist in Residence at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. Her interest in repeated form and pattern has led to her to explore the repeated patterns in maths, music and physics. She lives and works in Delhi and is an enthusiastic amateur astronomer.

Dr Jochen Hennig trained as a physicist and is currently curator of scientific collections at the Humboldt-Üniversität. Jochen was also co-curator of WELTWISSEN. 300 Jahre Wissenschaften in Berlin at Martin Gropius Bau Berlin (2010-11), a large scale exhibition of scientific collections and newly commissioned artworks.

Agnes Meyer-Brandis is an artist. Her work engages with science –  fact and fiction, fantasy and technology – by way of cloudcore scanners, the migration of moon geese, public meteor watching and much more. Agnes is the founder of the Research Raft for Subterranean Reefology u.V. (Forschungsfloß FFUR), a small institute that carries out research focused on investigating and studying underground phenomena and forms of life.

Diana Sherlock is a Calgary-based independent curator, writer and instructor at the Alberta College of Art and Design. Her interests include display culture, exhibition histories and collecting practices. Her most recent projects engage research and commissioning models that create opportunities for contemporary artists to produce new work in response to specific contexts and histories.

Norma Windmöller is a research associate at Das Technisches Bild, Helmholz-Zentum für Kulturtechnik at Humboldt-Üniversität. Her research focuses on the specific ways artists have employed the camera obscura, an instrument that straddles the boundary between art and the natural sciences.

SATELLITE SALON is brought to you by artists Lucy Powell and Andrea Roe and writer-curator Dr. Sara Barnes. The salon hosts artists, scientists, writers and curators in various venues in Berlin and the UK. We aim to establish stimulating dialogue around changing themes, leading to a productive network of interested individuals with an eye to facilitating art/science collaboration.

Image: Antonia Low, Zwischenzier, 2006. Courtesy the artist.

 

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